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Workshop on Indigenous Property Rights and their Implication in Brazil

  • Hoover Institution in Washington 1399 New York Ave NW Washington, DC USA (map)

Sponsored by the Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies
, the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and the Liberty to Grow Foundation

In 2018, we launched the Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies. It is aimed at studying the institutions around which indigenous peoples organized their economies prior to European contact, how colonialism has abandoned those institutions, and how the pre-contact institutions might serve as a foundation for renewing indigenous economies. To date, most of the Hoover Project has focused on the U.S., Canada, and New Zealand.

Now we have a small grant to expand the Hoover Project to include indigenous property rights in Brazil. To kick-start this effort, we plan to host a day-long workshop at the Hoover Institution's office in Washington, D.C. on April 29, 2019. The workshop will begin with a discussion of the Hoover Project followed by presentations that suggest how indigenous property rights and governance structures affect resource use in Brazil, and will conclude with a roundtable discussion of what additional research is necessary to renew indigenous economies in Brazil.

Presentations:

Indigenous Property Rights and Indigenous Prosperity
Terry L. Anderson, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and co-founder, Alliance for Renewing Indigenous Economies

Lessons from Studies of Indigenous Land Tenure in the Americas
Dominic Parker, associate professor, Department of Agricultural & Applied Economies Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Land Reform Policies and Resource Use in Brazil
Bernardo Mueller, professor of economics at the University of Brasília

Indigenous land rights and deforestation: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon
Silke Heuser, Senior Evaluator, Independent Evaluation Group, World Bank

To further inform the discussion:

Normative Shifts in the Legal Landscape: Where are we? Where are we headed with Indigenous land rights?
Karol Boudreaux, Chief Program Officer, Landesa

This is an invitation-only roundtable discussion. If you would like more information, please contact Wendy Purnell: wendy@indigenousecon.org